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Beatles Rarity of the Week – “It Won’t Be Long” (monitor mix of take 7)

Welcome to the Beatles Rarity of the Week. After The Beatles’ made history by recording their entire 14-track debut LP Please Please Me in one day on February 11, 1963 (save the 4 singles tracks), things were to be handled differently. The incredible success of The Beatles in 1963 kept the band very busy. With a plethora of BBC radio and television appearances and live shows occupying so much of their time, it was more practical to fit studio time in on a “few hours here/few hours there” basis between other commitments. This is why the follow up LP, With The Beatles, was recorded a few tracks at a time whenever studio time fit into their schedule. The album was recorded between July 18 and October 23, 1963 and, within that date range, The Beatles also managed to record the single tracks “I Want To Hold Your Hand” and “This Boy” as well as their first Christmas message disc sent to their fan club members.

 

The Beatles, 1963

The Beatles, 1963

 

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14 people think this is FAB!

#askNat – concerning Klaus Voormann’s career in music

This week on #askNat I’m responding to “Karen S.” who left a comment in the thread for a Beatles Rarity of the Week that featured Klaus Voormann playing bass with John Lennon’s Plastic Ono Band (this one specifically). This is what she said:

Fabulous Nat! Have you already covered how Klaus Voormann came to play the bass? Would this be an appropriate subject to ask about in “askant?”

I told Karen I’d see what I could do and since we are all cool people on The Beatles Rarity, we can forgive her little typo error (“#askant”). I am a “Nat” and not an “ant,” however, like “Beatles,” we are all bugs, so no harm done. Karen’s idea is a good one because while I’ve mentioned Klaus on numerous occasions on this site, I’ve yet to cover his story in any detail. His involvement with The Beatles over the years has been significant and certainly has withstood the test of time.

 

Klaus Voormann, c. 1959

Klaus Voormann, c. 1959

 

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19 people think this is FAB!

Beatles Rarity of the Week – “Tight A$” (out-take version)

Welcome to the Beatles Rarity of the Week. This time around we see John Lennon’s appreciation of the early Elvis-style rockers complete with a dash of the rockabilly groove of pioneer Carl Perkins.

 

John Lennon, circa1973

John Lennon, circa1973

 

While John himself, often critical of his own work in hindsight, said in one of his early seventies interviews that “Tight A$” was a bit of a throwaway, its clever wordplay, while really saying nothing, shows he still has the cockiness of some of his earlier work. The very title is creatively made radio friendly by purportedly being “Tight As” for any censors that ask what he’s singing, but since the “$” is used in print instead of a single “s,” we know the real title and what he’s really singing is “Tight Ass.” The tactic was quite effective as the song got plenty of airplay on the AOR (album-oriented rock) stations when it came out, allowing John to say the forbidden “ass” word over the airwaves more than twenty times a pop.

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#askNat – concerning honorable mentions in Paul McCartney’s “Let ‘Em In”

This week’s #askNat inquiry arrived to me via an email from Stephen Cornish of Melbourne, Australia. Stephen says this:

Interested in the song “Let Em In.” There is conflicting information about who the people are that Paul McCartney refers to in the song. Just wondering if you could help. Thanks.

Sure thing. Stephen, of course, is referring to Paul’s 1976 single with Wings. “Let ‘Em In” is also the opening track for the Wings At The Speed of Sound album soon (as of this writing) to be released in remastered form for the Paul McCartney Archive Collection.

 

Paul McCartney, 1976

Paul McCartney, 1976

 

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Beatles Rarity of the Week – “Yesterday” (live in Munich, 1966)

Welcome to the Beatles Rarity of the Week. This week I’m going to touch on a little bit about “Yesterday.” Don’t worry though – I promise to not go into anything about the too-well-known account of Paul McCartney dreaming it up as “Scrambled Eggs.” My focus here is on live performances.

 

The Beatles perform live at Munich Germany's Circus-Krone, 1966

The Beatles perform live at Munich Germany’s Circus-Krone, 1966

 

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24 people think this is FAB!

George Harrison CD box set “The Apple Years” is on it’s way

While a few Apple singles preceded it, the very first Apple album was George Harrison’s Wonderwall Music released in the U.K. on November 1st, 1968 (and one month later in the U.S.). Not only was this a “first” for Apple, but represented a few other “firsts” too as it was not only the debut solo release by George Harrison but also the first of any solo release by a member of The Beatles. The album served as the soundtrack to the swinging sixties drama film Wonderwall directed by Joe Massot and featured guest appearances by Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton and Monkees member Peter Tork.

By 1974, George had formed his own record label, Dark Horse, and two years later, after his previous contractual obligations were up, was recording on the label himself. Beginning with his 1976 album Thirty-Three and 1/3, George remained with Dark Horse throughout the rest of his career. In February 2004, a CD box set was released that included all of the non-compilation solo albums by George issued on the label. The collection was appropriately titled The Dark Horse Years 1976 – 1992 and included the albums Thirty-Three and 1/3 (1976), George Harrison (1979), Somewhere In England (1981), Gone Troppo (1982), Cloud Nine (1987) and Live In Japan (1992). While, unlike the other discs, Live In Japan contained no bonus tracks, it was released on an SACD disc that contained both a straight stereo and 5.1 surround mix. The set also included a DVD compilation of George Harrison videos that was issued separately later. Each of the individual CDs also became available as a separate purchase.

 

Dhani Harrison's photo of his feet propped up on a mixing board. In the background left, a box set of George Harrison's Dark Horse Years is seen and left of it (above the word LOVE) is a test pressing of the upcoming Apple Years box set.

Dhani Harrison’s photo of his feet propped up on a mixing board. In the background left, a box set of George Harrison’s Dark Horse Years is seen and left of it (above the word LOVE) is a test pressing of the upcoming Apple Years box set.

 

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38 people think this is FAB!